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in europe of binding disparate economies by means of common currency. this is not the first time these things that happened. it happened in the united states of america. you have disparate economies in the united states of america that are bound together monetarily. missouri and washington state are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory t
movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. by effectively taking his hand and pushing it into the future, grabbing value that had not been generated. -- that is debt. producing the wealth, from which they hoped they would pay the debt. moneylenders, bankers. covering the fact that he had already paid wages, hoping that there would be something less for -- left for him. the fact that there is recycling -- you take a value for the future, bring it into the present, so as to develop -- delivered the body to the future. the problem with this process is once y
. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talked about a single- minded focus, yet you are leaving with jobs undone. how do you feel about leaving at this particular point in time? >> we still have several weeks. we have laid out the plans and all these efforts i have been part of and other efforts as well. i still have some optimism that we will get this job done. one of the reasons i did not run again is the really wanted to focus these last two years. i knew if i was running, i would not be able to be in the hundreds of hours of negotiations i have been in. i believe many of the ideas we have generated will be part of any solution, whether it comes before the end of this year or early next year. i believe the work product we have produced will be part of the solution. >> you talked about no longer missing a 80% of family birthdays. what will you be doing then? >> i will be doing some speaking and doing some teaching. i have people starting to talk to me about other opportunities. i can assure you
the way europe has been growing, we will have a small consolidation, such as the small consolidation proposed by the president. if you want to have the kind of growth that i hope we can have with a bigger consolidation, that one is being proposed by speaker boehner. >> thank you. >> i would like to focus on something that is probably more of interest to the economists and ordinary people. let's talk about ratios. what i heard you lay out, dr. zandi, was more of an ideal situation. they get you at roughly at $3 trillion. deficit-reduction over the course of 10 years. you went on to add the $1.20 trillion over last year's negotiations on the debt ceiling. the negotiations over last year's debt ceiling -- the new number would really be 1-1. that is not actually my question. i want to get to now. we have looked at the president's offer. we haven't found any spending reductions at all. we found the $1.6 trillion tax increases. the stimulus spending,we saw the extension of the unemployment insurance, which is an increase in spending. the delay in the spending cuts whatsoever. do you think
with christine lagarde from the imf. i asked about the reforms that were taking place in europe. i asked, would any of these reforms be taking place without europe being in a fiscal crisis mode? her answer was, absolutely not. unless the revolver is at the temple of the politicians with the finger on the trigger, they're not capable of summoning the collective will to tell the people that represent that they need to take steps to resolve a problem and will cause disappointment and pain to do so. my experience in the years i have had in politics was exactly that. we never would have gotten what we did in 2011 without the threat of defaulting on our debt. to think that we could put a structure in place today that perhaps we would all be comfortable with in terms of solving our long-term problems and be assured that 10 years or not that congress would not have modified that dozens of times to the response of into joints who are banging on the door and saying this is to develop much pain, we could hardly sustain a policy for months around here, let alone 10 years. if you want to fix the long-term s
will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate jig there are a lot of reasonable proposals being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenu
are seeing in europe. many feel they have nowhere to turn. we must never let that happen here. and election has come and gone. the people have made their choice. policy-makers still have a duty to choose between ideas that work and those that do not. when one economic policy after another has failed our working families, it is no answer to expressed compassion for them or create government programs that offer promise but do not create reforms. we must come together to advance new strategies for the the people out of poverty. let's go with what works. looking around this room at the men and women who are carrying on jack kemp's legacy, i know we are answering the call. this cause is right. jack kemp started this. we know the good fight for the american ideal wood -- will go on until we reach all people. thank you for coming in here this evening. thank you for having us this night. congratulations to marco. [applause] >> now, this is 35 minutes. >> thank you. one of the highlights of the campaign for me is when i got to travel to meet paul's mom. >> thank you. i am really privileged to be her
? it is interesting. one of the things that has happened is what we called eastern europe is very differentiated. they no longer have much in common with one another. >> more on life and soviet east germany sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> punched me, to me, take things from me. >> he is not safe on that bus. >> i have been on that bus and they are as good as gold. >> all of us were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and have no words for, other than adolescents. finally, people are starting to stand back and say, this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal right of passage. there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. we decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were bubbling up. coming up to the surface to say, this is not something we can accept any more as a normal part of our culture. >> the filmmaker has followed up for award winning film by gathering essays. -- her toward women -- her award winning film by gathe
in plant, investments and hire folks. obviously, globally, the economy in europe is still soft. asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were a few years ago, but what all of you recognize and what you have told me is that everybody's looking to america. because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that's broad-based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globally and we can get the kind of cycle that all of us have been waiting for and want to see. what's holding us back right now is a lot of stuff that is going on in this town. and i know that many of you have come down here to try to see if there is a way to break through the log jam and go ahead and get things done and i'm here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. what we have said instead is, let's allow higher rates to go up for the top 2% and that includes all of you, yes, but not that is going to affect your spe
about the fiscal finance in this country because i think we are getting a real break because europe is having the problems they are having and, as a result, the world has excess savings and are doing the investment and do not have a great choice. they look at us and say, we are better. interest rates fell. we are living on borrowed time. why they are playing political games when there is such a real issue. we are self-dealing in our own debt. >> the federal reserve is the largest holder of u.s. date. purges in over 70% of all new u.s. debt issuances. if you look at people who are buying our debt, their appetite is getting less, not greater. they are buying short-term debt because of huge interest rates risks. if you look at china in particular, they are looking for corporate bonds rather than u.s. treasury securities because they do not like what they see. we are living on borrowed time. we have created another bubble. my view is the reason the fed is doing that is because the mandate was changed in the late 70's to where they have to be concerned with unemployment. we need a fiscal
they react. one of the things that has happened since 1989 is the reason we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have much in common with one another except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more >anne applebaum from her historical narrative, "iron curtain," sunday night on "q &a " on that night at 8:00. >> at 10:00 eastern, efforts to increase homeownership programs hosted by the burping institution. in 30 minutes, the national taxpayer advocate discusses what the fiscal cliff needs for -- means for tax filing season. the doc fix will be explained that at 9:15, i look at how the u.s. population is expected to u.s. population is expected to change over the
of forces in europe, at sea and on land, it is not reasonable they could have responded. this was over in a matter of 20- 30 minutes with respect to special mission specifically. and we had no forces ready or tethered, if you will, to focus on the mission. to go there was no mention of the cia report despite their close to the pact and more personal than they had diplomats. did they share --- >> we cannot discuss classified organizations. >> thank you all very much. >> two committees are holding hearings today on the attack on the consulate in libya that killed four americans. the senate foreign relations committee. we will hear from william burns and others at 8:00 eastern. you can see that live on c- span2. he will go to the other side of the capital in the afternoon to testify before the house foreign affairs committee about the libya report. that is live on c-span3 at 1:00 eastern. in a few moments, today's headlines and your calls live on "washington journal." the house is in session at noon eastern to hear plan be addressing the so-called fiscal cliff. in about 45 minutes, we wil
.s., western europe, and japan. today there are 4 billion people participating in the economy. we have got the same antiquated tax system today that we had 20 years ago. we should be taking the opportunity there to look this thing and say, what does it take to be globally competitive today? yes, i was on the commission, and some might think i like that proposal a lot, which i did. it does not have to be exactly like that, but there are some principles that are a part. -- that are important in there. the whole idea of during individual corporate cap gains, do it all at the same time make sense. the territorial system for companies makes sense, with clauses so that nothing -- nothing screwy happens. then we relook at all these deductions, and we should be looking at do we want all these at a time when our economy needs more flexibility to respond to a very globally different place than we had 20 years ago. it is -- to pass up this -- i think it a shame to pass up this opportunity to actually fix and get the base rates off of a system that has just evolved to chaos. i was heartened by listeni
with the challenges in europe, with china going through a transition, with india's political system, as chair of the india caucus, almost more this functional than ours. we look pretty darn good if we can put a real plan in place. >> what would be the size of the plan? >> i think it gets north of $4 trillion, whether it gets to $6 trillion. this goes back to where you start. two points -- kind of on the opening round questions. it is important to remember that the simpson-bowles plan, which has gained a lot of attention, or the gang of six, which is built off the simpson- bowles, the presumptions that went into those plans assumed that all the top rates would go back up. when you start from that, even though i think simpson-bowles's idea that he would bring the rates down to the high 20's is a bit of a stretch. i do not think we will see that kind of across the board almost zeroing out in some places of tax expenditures that would require. they can show a path towards meaningful tax reform even with the rates at the higher level. point two, and this is one of the things where i think those of
that has happened since 1989 is the region we used to call europe has become very differentiated. they no longer have much in common with one another. >> more with anne applebaum sunday night at 8:00 p.m. on c- span's "q&a." next, grover norquist was on this morning's "washington journal." this is 40 minutes. host: someone who's been in the news and on the news lately is on your screen now, grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform. mr. norquist, make your case for no tax increases at this point in our economic situation. guest: two years ago president obama extended all of the tax cuts that lapsed in janurary. he did so because he said the economy was weak and raising taxes ordered. the economy is not any stronger now than it was. in addition to the tax increase, he wants to impose by letting some of the bush tax cuts laps, he has already got a trillion dollars in tax increases that starting in january to pay for obamacare. when you think about fiscal cliff, the bush tax cuts have collapsed, sequestration cuts spending, and then there's a trillion dollar tax increas
. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has reinforced the less than that one of the most effective ways to address long-term security challenges is to help build the capabilities of our allies. we have seen its approach with our counterinsurgency campaigns in iraq and afghanistan and our top to assert -- our counter- terrorism efforts in yemen and somalia. we are expanding our security force assistance to a wider range of partners, in order to address a broader range of security challenges. in the asia-pacific, the middle east, and europe, africa, and latin america 3 to implement this area of strategy, the services are retaining the security cooperation capabilities we have honed over a decade of war and making investments in regional expertise. for example, for the army's new regionally aligned for grade a g brigade structure, they are able to engage on a rotational basis -- regio0nally aligned brigade structure, they are able to engage on a rotational basis. to cut through the prophecy and red tape to provide the assistance -- through the burea crac
of europe. it was time for europe to pick up their own fair share of the burden. the same thing was true with fighting for fishermen. the same thing was true issue after issue out here on the house floor. dodd frank, which was debated right here on the house floor, the same place where abe lincoln was trying to get the votes to abolish slavery, same seats, barney frank led the effort to create the new financial services constitution for the 21st century, not just in the united states but on the whole planet. and there were some provisions that were so important, that is creating a consumer protection bureau, that they would rather have elizabeth warren be a senator than the head of the consumer protection bureau and that is a small part of the toe talt of that -- totality of that bill. he said stand up for what's right, even if you don't win early. he has been a parliamentary and substantive cop on the beat walking around here on the house floor using the microphone as his nightstick in order to make sure that nothing happened here that was wrong, would go uncommented upon so that people
? it is interesting, one of things that happened since 1989 is the region we used call eastern europe. these countries don't have things in common with one another. >> more with ann alpbaum from the end of world war ii. from her narrative "iron curtain" sunday night on c-span's q&a. "washington journal" today looked a at the fiscal cliff negotiations with particular look at the found daises. the first we spoke to an associated press reporter. >> our series on the so-call fiscal cliff continues with a dive into social security. here to talk about the program and how it is involved in these discussions, negotiations over the america's financial future. here is stephen ohlemacher. thank you for being here. how many people in america receive social security? >> a little bit more than 56 million people get social security. the average benefit is a little over $1,200 a month. so maybe it is like $13,000, $14,000 a year. >> we're talking about retirees but also the disabled. >> yes, fairly wide group of people get social security benefits, retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, widower
of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region we used to call eastern europe has become differentiated. it is no longer -- they do not have much in common except for the memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, and the end of world war ii through 1956. "iron curtain," sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. former budget director peter orszag says concerns over the fiscal cliff have been overblown and the focus should shift to the debt limit increase. the global vice chairman for citigroup predicted that republicans will ultimately caved in on tax increases. this is 15 minutes. >> four protections. discuss what will the impending fiscal cliff means for tax filing season. and the formula for paying doctors under medicare. later, a look at how the u.s. population is expected to change. our guests are jennifer, a demographer for the senses, and william, a demographer for the brookings -- >> medicare costs will grow less than 3%, which is unbelievably low by historical standards. or that we saw last year. in a continuation of a value- based health-care syst
been engaging with partners in europe and are optimistic about the prospects. we have been working with our partners in other regions and countries where hezbollah has a significant presence and infrastructure, including south east asia, south america, and west africa. we are pleased with the progress we are making. we will continue to take action so has the law recognizes its behavior is unacceptable and cannot blogger offering within communities at home and abroad. as we have seen, the world of counter-terrorism is changing fast. some of the most dangerous threats received it noticeably but new ones are emerging. these cannot be viewed with complacency. the political transformations in the middle east and north africa are having a profound effect on our form policy, including our counter-terrorism. aq was not a part of the popular uprising that led to democratic tensions since -- democratic transitions across the middle east and north africa. well never expected this to be a painless process, revolutionary transformations are dislocating and unpredictable by their nature. there a
america because nobody wants to see us see what happened in europe and greece. it does not have to happen here. in conjunction with that, this has to be the best place in the world to do business. economic growth, if we grow our economy, it will help our debt and, of course, more opportunity for everyone. so i hope to work with everyone on this table -- everyone at this table on those issues. worse, always making sure -- of course, always making sure that america is safe. [applause] >> thank you. >> my number one priority echoes what kelly said. we need to come up with a deal that keep us from the automatic spending cuts that go into effect in january and deal with a senior tax system -- a saner tax system. we can follow a framework as recommended by the simpson- bowles commission that will allow us to protect benefits but will also make some of the tough choices that kelly was talking about. i think we have to put everything on the table for that kind of a deal. we have to look at revenues. we have to look of the domestic side of the budget. we of the look of the defense side. and we hav
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)